The missing link the lost art of handwriting analysis

And this I fully support. Blue tongues, lips and stained teeth eventually became part of the school uniform. It is simply not the clearest way to communicate if expressing what you mean swiftly, and being understood, is your primary purpose.

You realise that Dickens had a thing about it. He quotes a Scottish headmaster who doubts the importance of training in handwriting and his footnote performs a tizzy of exasperation. But outside of school?

It is shocking to discover that, in the late 20th century, leading European and American companies might still have been using graphology in making their recruitment decisions. Share via Email A handwritten note … when did you last write a letter?

The lost art of reading other people's handwriting

As a history, The Missing Ink is patchy and too anecdotal for its own good, but its advocacy of one of the most humane and pleasurable forms of self-expression is pretty much irresistible. Yet to some including a few of his more benighted creative writing students, it would seem handwriting is simply unnecessary.

Well, this is another thing that Hensher questions. Then there was italic, developing from the faux antiquity of William Morris and hardening into the instructive books of Monica Bridges.

The missing ink : the lost art of handwriting

Philip Hensher's celebration of handwriting and the individuality it enacts comes at a time when, because of technology, this once essential human activity seems "about to vanish from our lives altogether".

He spends a chapter admiring the way the French teach handwriting and thinks theirs is the nicest writing of any western country. He really gets going in the 18th century with the development of copperplate, "still the hand we reach for at elevated moments of our lives" you see it replicated in printed form on certain kinds of invitation, especially to weddings.

And this is a subject that Hensher brings up in his book — that handwriting is a reflection of our own selves. But this is also a celebration of the physical act of writing: There is a brilliant little piece on how handwriting features in Dickens's novels, where so often "the act of writing, of forming letters, acts as an impetus for the plot".

The Palmer method, which is almost certainly responsible for the way your grandmother wrote on your birthday cards, seems today to be full of superfluous curlicues, but it was actually designed, we learn, with speed and physicality in mind.

He claims Europeans can always pick out the handwriting of Americans because we are the only ones who have loops in our letters. But the book turned out not to address that except briefly in the first and last chapters. I admit that now.

In Hensher, each of the "great" reformers gets a chapter. In Hensher, each of the "great" reformers gets a chapter. Well, this is another thing that Hensher questions.

But who sends letters anymore? Photo by Eamonn McCabe. And all that typing looks the same. It dawned on him that, having abandoned fountain pens for keyboards, we have lost one of the ways by which we come to recognize and know another person.

And this is a subject that Hensher brings up in his book — that handwriting is a reflection of our own selves. The pile of handwritten essays is a kind of visual cacophony — spiky or looped or crabbed or wandering, with every shade of blue or black, every kind of pressure and slant and flourish.

Skip forward a few years two, in fact, to the age of 9 where my love for writing only became stronger. Repeating endless cursive letters along wide-spaced, pale blue lines. I remember seeing an infographic in which it explained how people do different descenders and what it reflects about their personality.

I once wrote a story about the value of hand-drawn mapswhich, like handwriting, are endangered by technology. If you are going to read this book, be prepared to take the good with the bad.

The Missing Ink: The Lost Art of Handwriting

All in all, my stance is that handwriting should never be phased out. And while I did enjoy the parts I mention above, I almost didn't make it past page There is a brilliant little piece on how handwriting features in Dickens's novels, where so often "the act of writing, of forming letters, acts as an impetus for the plot".

The Missing Ink NPR coverage of The Missing Ink: The Lost Art of Handwriting by Philip Hensher. News, author interviews, critics' picks and more.

Oct 11,  · The Missing Ink speaks about the dying art of handwriting.

The lost art of handwriting

It speaks about the evolution of writing, its history, its tools, and its place today in education and society.

The book includes research and factual information and statements from "witnesses" to the process of handwriting/5.

The Missing Ink: The Lost Art of Handwriting and millions of other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a /5(37). When Philip Hensher realized that he didn't know what one of his closest friend's handwriting looked like, he felt that something essential was missing from their friendship.

It dawned on him that, having abandoned fountain pens for keyboards, we have lost one of the ways by which we come to recognize and know another person. Jun 03,  · Handwriting is being dropped in public schools — that could be bad for young minds.

Google’s new hands-free computer is finding its way into operating rooms.

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The missing link the lost art of handwriting analysis
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